North Link Light Rail Update: QFC closing, Brooklyn Station naming, street greening

Roosevelt Station updates

Signs of impending light rail construction are bittersweet, aren’t they? The FUTURE is coming, but the neighborhood has to make room for it first.

Case in point, the Roosevelt QFC’s last day is Saturday, May 12. Roosiehood reports that the store’s staff will be transferred to other local QFC stores. According to the Seattle Times, the Roosevelt QFC was the first in the chain, opening in 1955.

The other recent sign of the impending FUTURE is the Standard Radio building being dismantled. Sound Transit’s contractor has removed the Vitrolite glass tiles from the building’s exterior. In May, the curved canopy and its neon lettering will be removed, and stored for later use in the station.

And one last bit of Roosevelt Station-related news: The stretch of NE 66th St (from I-5 to 15th Ave NE) identified by the Seattle City Council as a “Green Street”* is getting a planning committee (made up of Sound Transit and “neighborhood representatives and city staff”). For more on “Green Streets,” visit the City of Seattle’s website here.

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In other North Link Light Rail news, there are some upcoming events for Brooklyn Station (or whatever you choose call it) that you might be interested in…

Brooklyn Station Construction Open House

Tuesday, May 1, from 6-8:30 PM, at the Neptune Theatre (1303 NE 45th St). Presentation starts at 6:30.

Agenda items include:

  • Revised construction schedule
  • Updated street, sidewalk and parking restriction plans
  • Construction noise and the nighttime noise variance process
  • Potential construction mitigation measures
  • Station naming

Brooklyn Station 60% Design Open House

Wednesday, May 23, from 6-8:30 PM, at the Neptune Theatre. Presentation starts at 6:30.

Agenda items include:

  • Design plans for Brooklyn Station
  • Initial concepts for station art
  • Station naming

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* Not the same as a “Greenway,” by the way. Here’s a Seattle Department of Transportation page on “Greenways.”

Comments

  1. When the Roosevelt district lost the monthly VME (Vintage Motorcyclist Enthusiasts) meet, it lost a lot of its soul. Now there is this. Jim and Sharon Goff operated a record and turntable parts and repair store, where that old Standard sign is, for years; forced out by the perceived need to build a choo-choo train to Northgate.

    It’s enough to ask the question: is this really progress or just change for the sake of change? I vote for the latter. Moreover, how long will the debt to built this train’s tunnel plague those who simply want to license an old car to get to the two or three jobs needed to make ends meet? Guess about 40 to 50 years and you’d be about right.

    • [comment deleted]

      Sorry, Eric G., but comments attacking other people are not okay here. Disagree with other commenters all you want, but let’s wish them the best of health while we’re at it.

  2. What happened to J&S Needles repair shop? Have they relocated?

  3. Anyone who’s ever been in major cities elsewhere in the world and seen how mass transit makes life easier and better knows that while the change is painful, it also leads to a better place to live.

    Like it or not, but people will continue to move into Seattle. The predictions in the 80s and 90s that online communications would lead to cities shrinking as people live and work out in the boonies turned out to be wrong- people want to live around other people.

    And as long as that’s the case, major cities will continue to grow. The only real question is whether we want smart growth (moving away from petroleum fuels, denser development, etc) or to try and keep things as they are?

    If we try to keep them as they are, our children won’t be able to afford to buy in our city because as the demand increases but housing supply stays the same, prices will skyrocket. So we have to do things like build mass transit, denser housing, and put more people into the same amount of space to keep costs reasonable.

  4. Jorgen Bader says:

    The University District Community Council, the Seattle Community Council Federtion, the North East District Council and many other community organizations support the name “University District” Station instead of “Brooklyn.” The public for the last two years at Sound Transit open houses have asked for the name “University District” or “U District” by overwhelming numbers. University District desribes the station location, identifies with the district, means a location to the public, would help the business district and inform the public the correct sop to get to the Quad, the UW’s University Tower, and district housing. Otherwise, the public will get off at the UW station by Husky Stadium, thinking that’s the stop for the Univesity District and wind up walking uphill for a mile. Let Sound Transit know your preference. If we keep at it, we may yet get some success in getting a meaningful station name.

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