Hundreds walk to remember, honor the Schulte family (PHOTOS)

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Walkers gathered under the swaying palms of the Wedgwood Top Pot before setting out.

Seattle Police Department officers wait to escort everyone down local streets. Local traffic was blocked as the group walked to and the memorial site.

Seattle Police Department officers and their rides wait to escort everyone down local streets. Local traffic was blocked as the group walked to and the memorial site.

 

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Pedestrian and cyclists, young and old, the sighted and the blind all participated, and fueled up with coffee and doughnuts beforehand, provided by Top Pot.

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This walker in orange was one of three I noticed walking with a white cane. She is pictured with her ASL interpreter (the woman in orange is Deaf-Blind).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (1 of 6).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (2 of 6).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (3 of 6).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (4 of 6).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (5 of 6).

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The walkers spread out to cover 35th Avenue NE on the way to the memorial site (6 of 6).

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A cameraman films the start of the walk on 35th Avenue NE.

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The group walks west on NE 73rd Street, after turning off 35th Avenue NE.

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Seattle Mayor Michael McGinn (center, light blue shirt) walks with Schulte family members down NE 73rd Street.

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More walkers heading down NE 73rd Street.

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Here the group is shown walking north on 33rd Avenue NE, taking the approximate route the family took on Monday, March 25. On the left side, Lacia Lynne Bailey, Judy’s Truffle (the baby goat), and some Schulte family members and friends stand where Bailey chatted with the Schultes one week ago. She was the last person to speak to the family before they attempted to cross NE 75th Street.

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More walkers heading up 33rd Avenue NE, to the memorial site.

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33rd Avenue NE and NE 75th Street. Some family members stand together on the right, behind the main crowd.

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Bailey talks to Dan Schulte, husband of Karina and father to Elias, who are both still at Harborview Medical Center. They are flanked by a female neighbor from the immediate area and two of Dan’s cousins.

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Members of the Schulte family, gathered in front of the memorial. Hundreds of neighbors and complete strangers have stopped by throughout the week to pay their respects, Bailey told us. She has been tending the site daily ever since people started leaving flowers, notes, or other tokens after the tragedy.

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One of the Seattle Police Department officers who escorted the walkers to and from the memorial site looks on.

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“Look out for pedestrians.”

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After spending some time at the memorial, the walk heads back to the starting point, heading east on NE 75th Street, before heading south down 35th Avenue NE.

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Mayor McGinn talks with Dongho Chang,(Chief Traffic Engineer for the Seattle Department of Transportation) at 33rd Avenue NE and NE 75th Street.

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Before starting down NE 75th Street with his family, this dad said to his small son, “This is the one time we’re walking in the street, buddy.”

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Mayor McGinn with Bailey, and Judy’s Truffle. Bailey has added to the baby goat’s original name in remembrance of Judy Schulte.

My thoughts, from Sunday, March 31:

More on this story on Ravenna Blog:

Memorial service in Indiana for Judy and Dennis Schulte (last updated on Thursday, April 11)

Arraignment of NE 75th Street DUI homicides suspect on Thursday (last updated on Thursday, April 11)

Timeout to say THANK YOU, on behalf of the Schulte family (last updated on Sunday, April 7)

Prayer Vigil for mother and child this Thursday night (PHOTOS) (last updated on Friday, March 29)

Memorial to the family at NE 75th St grows (PHOTOS) (last updated on Sunday, March 31)

Memorial and medical funds set up for victims of Monday’s traffic tragedy (last updated on Thursday, March 28)

Suspect in Monday’s traffic fatalities no stranger to DUIs (last updated on Sunday, March 31)

Multiple casualty incident on NE 75th St near Eckstein Middle School (PHOTOS) (last updated on Wednesday, March 27)

Comments

  1. Holly Jessop says

    I appreciate all these pictures, but I have to say I especially appreciate the picture of the deaf-blind woman with her caregiver. For 5 years now I’ve been a caregiver for adults with developmental disabilities, and the client I currently work with is deaf-blind. She has a very small amount of sight so we’re able to communicate with her using ASL (something I’m still learning). It’s really good to see that population represented and out to support a good cause. Plus I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been out with my clients over the years (many of whom can’t even walk on their own) and have had people almost hit us, steal handicap spots we were waiting to park in, etc.

    • says

      Thanks, Holly! That picture was special for me, too. I took two years of ASL at Seattle Central Community College, back in 2005-07. We had to do a lot of outside hang-out-with-Deaf-folks activities as a part of our coursework, and I was fascinated by the way the Deaf-Blind work with their interpreters — their hands “riding” over the top of the interpreter’s hands as he/she sign.

      I saw this woman in the crowd and got excited! I asked/signed to her interpreter if she was Deaf-Blind and she said yes. Turns out she had some sight and could see me near her, so I signed back “thank you for coming.” And she smiled. And I kept taking pictures.

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