Welcome to the 2015 Seattle City Council District Games (UPDATE)

Earlier in April, the City of Seattle finally released the official 2015 map of the Seattle City Council Districts. The reason for the map and the new way of electing our city councilmembers being (via seattle.gov):

In 2013, Seattle voters passed a measure amending our city’s charter to establish City Council districts. In 2015, voters will elect seven out of the nine City Council members by district. The remaining two positions will be elected “at-large” (city-wide) in positions 8 and 9.

Our Ravenna neighborhood is located in Council District 4, along with Bryant, Roosevelt, View Ridge, Sand Point, Windermere, Laurelhurst, Hawthorne Hills, the University District, Eastlake, half of Wedgwood, most of Wallingford, and a touch of Fremont — which is why it is so great to finally have a city-approved map with hard boundaries.

Northern portion of the Council Districts map. Click to open the interactive version.

Northern portion of the Council Districts map. Click to open the interactive version.

Within the interactive map above, Seattle residents can search for their address to find out which Council District they are located in, or just zoom in and around to see what neighborhoods are located in which districts.

On Wednesday, March 12, Crosscut held an event called “Mapping Seattle’s New Political Landscape,” where contributors Ben Anderstone and Knute Berger talked about Seattle’s newly created City Council Districts.

While we did not attend, we did follow along on twitter. Here’s what the duo had to say about our District 4, in one slide:

As for how City Council races will be scheduled in the future, the City Clerk’s office lays out the following timeline:

In 2015:

  • All nine Councilmember seats will be up for election and the transition will occur during that city election
  • Seven districted Councilmembers will be elected to four-year terms
  • The remaining two at-large Councilmembers will be elected to a two-year term

In 2017:

  • Seven districted Councilmembers will be elected to four-year terms*
  • The two at-large seats will be elected to four-year terms
  • The at-large Councilmembers will from this point forward be on the same election cycle as the Mayor and City Attorney

Then in the fall of 2022 (and every ten years thereafter), “a five-member Districting Commission will be created to redraw the district boundaries.”

Current City Councilmember Jean Godden has already tossed her hat into the ring for the newly created District 4 seat (she’s a View Ridge resident). But so far, at the time of writing, and with the filing deadline being over a year away, only current CMs have filed for reelection.

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One of Councilmember Tim Burgess’s legislative aides, Alex Pedersen, made a suspicious move earlier in April: His monthly “4 to Explore: A Northeast Neighborhoods Newsletter,” published online or sent via email since August 2013, showed up in paper form in the Seattle Times. When asked if he’s considering running, fellow Council District 4 resident Pedersen told us (via email):

We hear a lot from interest groups but not enough from families because they are busy working to get by. So the newsletter highlights not only important neighborhood issues, but fun stuff that will be engaging and relevant each month.

I support Jean Godden and she’s aware of the newsletter :)

The deadline for getting on the ballot in 2015 is Friday, May 15, 2015, so District 4 residents have plenty of time to decide to run. You can track all the City Council candidates running in the 2015 Primary here, on seattle.gov.

And to all present and possible future Council District candidates, I say: May the odds be ever in your favor.

 

UPDATE (10:07 AM): Serendipitously, Crosscut’s Knute Berger has a piece out just this morning about this very topic: “New survey offers tips for implementing Seattle’s new city council districts.”

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* Correction: We accidentally repeated the “Seven districted Councilmembers…” line in both lists. Thank you, Tony Provine, for alerting us to this error.

Prayer Vigil for mother and child this Thursday night (UPDATE, PHOTOS)

Lacia Bailey, with her pet goat, speaks with Paul Schulte, brother of Dennis Schulte, during a Thursday prayer vigil at Sand Point Community United Methodist Church in Seattle for Karina Ulriksen-Schulte and her son, Elias Schulte. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

Lacia Bailey, with her pet goat, speaks with Paul Schulte, brother of Dennis Schulte, during a Thursday prayer vigil at Sand Point Community United Methodist Church in Seattle for Karina Ulriksen-Schulte and her son, Elias Schulte. (Ken Lambert/The Seattle Times)

UPDATE (Friday, March 29): We attended Thursday’s prayer vigil at Sand Point Community Methodist Church, and share a bit of it with you here.

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The Schulte family, including the grandparents, Judy and Dennis, had started attending the church recently. The grandparents were able to celebrate the birth of their new grandchild with the congregation before they passed.

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Sunset in the west from outside the church.

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Staff from Fire Station 40, located in Wedgwood, attended the service. Lieutenant Milton was one of those who responded to the scene on Monday, March 25:

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Many families with children at the service. Blank cards upon which messages to the family could be written were handed to everyone as they entered the church.

“Words of comfort from Holy Scripture” read by Pastor Cathlynn Law were Psalm 130, Isaiah 41:10, portions of Isaiah 43, and Romans 8:26.

A “prayer for healing for Karina and Baby Elias” was read responsively, and included the lines “give them courage,” “give them your strength,” “may they feel your comfort,” and “may they be reminded of the great love in this community for them.”

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During the heart of the vigil, participants lined up to light candles “as a symbol of light and life and hope” for Karina and Baby Elias.

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Candles lit for the family. Pastor Law can be seen at the pulpit in the background.

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Exterior of the church, near the end of the service, which closed with the “releasing of the spirits of Dennis and Judy Schulte” and a blessing of those gathered.

As for the baby goat, seen in the picture at the top:

PREVIOUSLY: The Schultes’ church family at Sand Point Community United Methodist Church (4710 NE 70th Street) is holding a prayer vigil for Karina and Baby Elias on Thursday, March 28, at 7 PM.


View Prayer vigil at Sand Point Community United Methodist in a larger map

All are welcome to attend.

Notice about the prayer vigil posted at the memorial on NE 75th St. Photo courtesy Lacia Lynn Bailey.

Notice about the prayer vigil posted at the memorial on NE 75th St. Photo courtesy Lacia Lynn Bailey.

Thursday is also Maundy Thursday, the fifth day of the Christian Holy Week when the Last Supper of Jesus Christ with the Apostles is commemorated.

UPDATE (Thursday, March 28): Looks like a memorial vigil/walk is forming up to take place on Monday, April 1, starting at the Wedgwood Top Pot at 70th and 35th, and traveling to and from the memorial site at 75th and 33rd. 4-5 PM. Details here.


View Walk/Vigil for the Schulte Family in a larger map

More on this story on Ravenna Blog:

Memorial service in Indiana for Judy and Dennis Schulte (last updated on Thursday, April 11)

Arraignment of NE 75th Street DUI homicides suspect on Thursday (last updated on Thursday, April 11)

Timeout to say THANK YOU, on behalf of the Schulte family (last updated on Sunday, April 7)

Hundreds walk to remember, honor the Schulte family (PHOTOS) (last updated on Monday, April 1)

Memorial to the family at NE 75th St grows (PHOTOS) (last updated on Sunday, March 31)

Memorial and medical funds set up for victims of Monday’s traffic tragedy (last updated on Thursday, March 28)

Suspect in Monday’s traffic fatalities no stranger to DUIs (last updated on Sunday, March 31)

Multiple casualty incident on NE 75th St near Eckstein Middle School (PHOTOS) (last updated on Wednesday, March 27)

Power outage along NE 65th St blamed on crow

Shortly before 1:00 PM this afternoon, sections of seven Northeast Seattle neighborhoods lost power. At peak, approximately 3,800 customers were affected.

Screen capture of the outage at its peak taken from Seattle City Light’s System Status webpage.

Parts of Roosevelt, Ravenna, Bryant, Wedgwood, View Ridge, and Sand Point all took a hit along NE 65th St, while nearly all of Windermere went down. The estimated time of restoration was listed at 3 PM, but many customers are seeing their lights coming back on ahead of that time.

Last week’s outage was blamed on a tree (and the high winds helped, we imagine). But what’s to blame this time?

A crow. Nature is out to get us, apparently.

Two blown transformers heard to be blamed for NE Seattle power outage (UPDATES)

UPDATE (2:58 PM): A quick check of the outage map reveals everything back to normal.

UPDATE (2:08 PM): Outage down to approximately 1,200 customers now.

UPDATE (1:03 PM): outage is down to approximately 1,800 customers Mostly in the Matthews Beach/View Ridge area of the map below affected.

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No, it’s not a comment on any Michael Bay movies — it’s a power outage.

Seattle City Light outage map screen grab from 12:45 PM.

More info on the Seattle City Light’s Power Lines blog:

Seattle City Light crews were responding to a power outage Tuesday that affected about 3,600 homes and businesses in the Ravenna, Roosevelt, View Ridge and Wedgwood neighborhoods of northeast Seattle.

The outage started about 11:20 a.m. A cause was not immediately known. An initial estimate for restoration of service was set for 3 p.m.

The general boundaries of the outage were NE 94th Street on the north, NE 65th Street on the south, Roosevelt Way NE on the west and Lake Washington on the east.

As of this posting, the cause is listed as “tree,” and the restoration time is estimated at 3:00 PM.

As we were calling the North Precinct about the dangerous traffic conditions at 15th Ave NE and NE 75th St — signals are out and many drivers on NE 75th St are not noticing and treating as a four-way stop — the officer on the other end of the phone blamed the outage on two transformers lost from the tops of poles, but we haven’t had confirmation of the exact cause from Seattle City Light.